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20130325
20130325
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
relationship. on april 7 of last year, the "new york times" reported benjamin netanyahu and mitt romney enjoyed a warm relationship. almost one year later, the israelis have given obama a medal. they appear to be on the same page on iran. >> diplomacy and sanctions have not stopped iran's nuclear programs. diplomacy and sanctions must be augmented by a clear and credible threat of military action. >> we will do what is necessary to prevent iran from getting the world's worst weapons. >> will this story have a happy ending? >> this story will not have a happy ending. what we saw this week was barack obama at his best, connecting with an audience, and he made a compelling case for the need for a two-state solution, the security of israel and the well- being of the region. >> charles? >> the emphasis has been on personality. what happened is obama changed his positions on the settlement and the peace process. he realized he made a terrible mistake in the first term. he insisted on a settlement freeze as a preconditio. it wrecked peace negotiations and stopped everything. he changed, went back and
israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu to apologize to turkey over mistakes that led to the death of activists on a flotilla bound for gaza. let me bring in congressman elliott angle. good to see you. >> thank you. >> congressman mike rogers had a very different take than john kerry about the president's trip. let me play it for you. >> i thought the trip was a disappointment for us. i think the president squandered great opportunity to show leadership and push them in a place where they could get an agreement out of a meeting, didn't get it, got a speech, get to some agreement on the path forward on syria, didn't get that. >> so from your perspective, congressman, a disappointment, a success? somewhere in between? >> it was a great success. i was with the president. i flew with him on air force one, traveled with him. he was treated like a rock star in israel. >> how interesting, he had a 10% approval rating going in. >> he was confident, spoke about a bond between the united states and israel. said he would always support israel, have their back. he talked about the jewish state
different agendas. i think that everything that was said, what you heard is that obama and benjamin netanyahu were much closer together are not. what obama said, he said we are not going to allow iran to have nuclear weapons. he said we are not going to allow them to have weapons in an attempt to contain them. they were much closer than they have been. a very key subject. a. lou: let's turn to something that i did not want to hear. that was america and president obama are ready to attack iran. found that there could be all sorts of excuses and rationalizations and reasons that the president of israel said that. judy, this is too bellicose for my taste. >> i think that he says exactly what is on his mind. i think that a 90-year-old president who helped israel acquire its own nuclear weapons, they were reminding israel and the united states at the top agenda item for israel is making sure that iran does not process redline. i think the two men are not closer to coming to an agreement on what that definition is. lou: if you would like to respond, please. >> it is a tricky issue. the u.
during a joint press conference with prime minister benjamin netanyahu. >> my main goal on this trip has been to have an opportunity to speak directly to the israeli people at a time when obviously what was already a pretty tough neighborhood has gotten tougher. and let them know that they have got a friend in the united states. that we have your back. that we consider israel's security of extraordinary importance to us. >> mike: but the next day while speaking to a younger audience the president urged israelis to put themselves in the shoes of palestinians. >> it is not fair that a palestinian child cannot grow up in a state of their own. [ applause ] >> living their entire lives with the presence of a foreign army that controls the movements not just of those young people but their parents and grandparents every single day. >> mike: how did the visit go over with israelis? joining us is former israeli ambassador to the united nations and president of the the jerusalem center for public affairs. author of the rise of nuclear iran. hi, great to see you and really happy to have you back.
the president and benjamin netanyahu and king abdullah of jordan. the focus on 0 the end game in syria and the threat from iran. this is going to occupy much of the president's time. >> reporter: it certainly will. if you look right now at the region, syria is imploding. it is exporting refugees. it is exporting instability. israel feels very threatened, very unsure about its future. that's obvious by the way they are walling themselves in psychologically and physically. and i think the president went there to give israel a big hug. some people in the region think that he went too far, that he went too far to embrace dynism as an ideology not just the state of israel, the palestinians generally were disappointed with the trip. nothing concrete coming out of it. the idea was to make israel feel secure in an increasingly insecure region. >> all right, richard engel, just back from the region. he's in new york this morning. thank you very much, richard. to david] and e.j. dionne. what did the president accomplish in terms of how did he perform? that's a big aspect of the trip. >> it was a
, richard, you talk about some of the private discussions going on between the president and benjamin netanyahu and king abdullah of jordan. the focus on 0 the end game in syria and the threat from iran. this is going to occupy much of the president's time. >> reporter: it certainly will. if you look right now at the region, syria is imploding. it is exporting refugees. it is exporting instability. israel feels very threatened, very unsure about its future. that's obvious by the way they are walling themselves in psychologically and physically. and i think the president went there to give israel a big hug. some people in the region think that he went too far, that he went too far to embrace dynism as an ideology not just the state of israel, the palestinians generally were disappointed with the trip. nothing concrete coming out of it. the idea was to make israel feel secure in an increasingly insecure region. >> all right, richard engel, just back from the region. he's in new york this morning. thank you very much, richard. to david] and e.j. dionne. what did the president accomplish
killed. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu has apologized to turkey for the killings of nine people on board the gaza-bound aid flotilla nearly three years ago. on may 30, 2010, israeli commandos raided the mavi marmara in international waters, killing nine turkish activists, including one u.s. citizen. president obama brokered netanyahu's's apology for the attack, which the israeli leader made friday at the very end of obama's first presidential visit to israel. in a phone call to the turkish prime minister, that tianeman apologize for "any errors that could have led to the loss of life." erdogan said the apology was one step toward normalizing relations between israel and turkey. is rumored nine of our citizens in international waters -- israel murdered nine of our citizens in international waters, they even tried to use negotiators to repair the relations between told them there would be no normalization of relations unless they apologized, paid compensation, and lifted the embargo on palestine. the parties mocked the government for believing [indiscernible] the phone call
there and accomplished what he intended to, namely to smooth over relations with prime minister benjamin netanyahu, to reach out to the israeli people and reaffirm the united states' commitment to them and also sent a message that peace talks should resume. so he sort of got that process, the start of that process under way. of course, peace talks haven't resumed yet. that was one of the president's key goals of his first administration. he wasn't able to do it. i think if he doesn't do it during the second term, he will see that as a failing. i've been talking to some experts in the region who say that, you know, the president has sort of given his secretary of state john kerry the lead on that. secretary kerry engaged on getting the peace talks resumed. the experts say the president needs to remain engaged if he wants to see that really happen. the people are going to watch the president closely to see what he does in the coming weeks to see if he can make progress on that point. >> kristen, what struck me about the tactic the president took on this trip was also to shore up -- we can't undersco
things deteriorating especially with that news conference last week, between benjamin netanyahu and president obama and sounded like netanyahu says, look, i've been given the okay to go ahead alone if i need to and what's in the middle east. >> you've handled it skillfully and see the administration use the relationship with morsi to help stop the hamas rocket attacks late last year and egypt has not turned fully towards iran yet and we need to keep egypt as part of an anti-iran coalition in the arab world and as you say, to maintain the peace agreement with israel. and that points to the need for risk diplomacy behind the scenes and i think the united states is doing it and a skillful ambassador in patterson and secretary of state in john kerry. and i think they're going to have them cease and desist from the aggressive tactics they're they think and turn this situation into one where the government begins to listen to the people on the street and gives them an opportunity to say what they have to say and try to reduce this level of violence. i don't think it would make any sen
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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